Eating Bee Pollen

I was spending an awful lot of time flicking through my favourite food blogs when my eye balls stopped on the ingredients “bee pollen”. I thought to myself, could this be? Actual bee pollen collected from a flower and found on a tiny bee’s legs? I had to try this stuff!

Bee pollen is different from the pollen that is airborne and causes allergic reactions. We all know how good raw honey is for you. The honey you buy from the shops is not raw, but boiled and broken down…which is a shame. We always have to stuff around with perfect nature don’t we! So pretty much anything bees touch turns to gold, including the pollen from flowers!

I found some bee pollen in the far back corner of a small health food shop and I was feeling very pleased with myself. Such an exotic sounding ingredient I had my hands on, but when I went to the checkout the man told me that this has become very popular and loads of people had been buying it. Maybe not so mysterious and exotic – but it still was to me. Maybe it was something like that Goji Berry craze a year or so back when they first hit the shelves (I love goji berries!). Everyone started to hear about this superfood with all its antioxidant-goodness.

Here is a photo I took of my bee pollen.

The different colours are from the various flower types the bees had visited. They take this pollen back to their hives and the pollen is harmlessly brushed off as the bees crawl into the hive. The honeybee collects only the purest of pollens.  It avoids all toxic plants, including those contaminated with pesticides. This pollen isn’t as effective if taken straight from the flower. You need bee spit to bind it up and activate it. Yum.

It tastes like powdery, flowery, honey goodness. I like it. I put it on my yogurt, or fruit, take it straight or blend it up in my juice. You only need a teaspoon or two a day.

Of course there is a healthy side to bee pollen as it is purely natural and taken from things that grow in soil, like all other things healthy. Here are some facts about bee pollen:

  • one of the richest and purest natural foods ever discovered
  • used as an immune system builder
  • it is very high in protein, containing between 20-35%, including all 22 amino acids.
  • it supplies human bodies with nearly every single nutrient we need to survive.
  • contains the richest known source of vitamins, minerals, proteins amino acids, hormones, enzymes and fats, as well as significant quantities of natural antibiotics. Most of the known vitamins in pollen exist in perfect proportion, which further enhances their value
  • jam-packed with vitamins, minerals, trace minerals, and phytonutrients.
  • regulates the action of the intestinal functions, it self-digests and aids the digestion of other foods
  • balances the blood, lymph, and aqueous and general metabolism system.
  • contains active antibiotic substances, which destroy bacteria on contact.
  • useful in cases of stress and nervous endocrine system disorders due to its high content of natural B Vitamins.
  • increases energy and mental alertness and is believed to slow down the ageing process.
  • this one convenient source is a storehouse of vitamins, minerals, proteins, fats and oils, carbohydrates, amino acids, over 5,000 enzymes and coenzymes, hormones, peptones, polypeptides and globulins, high concentrations of the nucleic acids RNA and DNA, and a variety of antibiotic substances.

You should always store your bee pollen out of direct sunlight. The best place for it is in the freezer and here it will keep it strength for up to 2 years.

The list of benefits could go on and on. Here is some more interesting, thorough and scientific information about bee pollen if you are keen to keep reading :)

– Love Treens

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Comments
6 Responses to “Eating Bee Pollen”
  1. Its one of the best things from nature! I used to take bee pollen everyday, and I would not get sick when all my roommates where coughing.

  2. Lou says:

    I just wondering as i am allergic to bees would i be ab;le to safely consume bee pollen?

    • Jodi says:

      Hi Lou,
      I’m definitely no expert but I would assume not? I have acquired a slight allergy to honey since my pregnancies and eating the bee pollen gives me the same symptoms so I tend to stay away, unfortunately!
      ❤ Jodi

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